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Archaeology

How to locate archaeological sites

How to Locate Archaeological Sites?

The quest to locate archaeological sites is a fascinating journey through history and technology. It combines the detective work of piecing together historical clues with cutting-edge scientific methods to uncover the secrets of the past.
The Archaeological Deposit Model (ADM) provides a vital tool for interpreting buried archaeological remains. Derived from geological stratigraphy, it is employed to understand the chronological sequence of site formation. It is composed of various elements such as artifacts, features, and ecofacts laid down through human activities, natural processes, or a combination of both.

Archaeological Deposit Model

The Archaeological Deposit Model (ADM) provides a vital tool for interpreting buried archaeological remains. Derived from geological stratigraphy, it is employed to understand the chronological sequence of site formation.
Dark Earth, also known as terra preta or Amazonian black earth, is a type of soil found in the Amazon Basin, widely revered for its incredible fertility and carbon storage capabilities. This human-made soil is a fascinating testament to the innovative agriculture of ancient Amazonian civilizations, revealing critical lessons for contemporary agricultural and climate-change mitigation strategies.

Dark Earth

Dark Earth, also known as terra preta or Amazonian black earth, is a type of soil found in the Amazon Basin, widely revered for its incredible fertility and carbon storage capabilities. This human-made soil is a fascinating testament to the innovative agriculture of ancient Amazonian civilizations, revealing critical lessons for contemporary agricultural and climate-change mitigation strategies.
Seriation is a relative dating technique used by archaeologists. The method relies on changes in the popularity of different styles or types of artifacts over time. It allows archaeologists to sequence or arrange a collection of objects in the order they were made.

Seriation in Archaeology

Seriation is a relative dating technique used by archaeologists. The method relies on changes in the popularity of different styles or types of artifacts over time. It allows archaeologists to sequence or arrange a collection of objects in the order they were made.
Projectile points, also known as arrowheads or spearheads, have been used throughout history for hunting and warfare. Their unique shapes and sizes offer clues to archaeologists about past civilizations, technological advancements, and migration patterns.

Projectile Point in Archaeology

Projectile points, also known as arrowheads or spearheads, have been used throughout history for hunting and warfare. Their unique shapes and sizes offer clues to archaeologists about past civilizations, technological advancements, and migration patterns.
Post excavation analysis, also known as post-fieldwork analysis or lab analysis, refers to the evaluation, interpretation, and recording of archaeological materials and data once the fieldwork has ended. It transforms the raw data collected during excavation into a meaningful narrative of the past.

Post excavation Analysis

Post excavation analysis, also known as post-fieldwork analysis or lab analysis, refers to the evaluation, interpretation, and recording of archaeological materials and data once the fieldwork has ended. It transforms the raw data collected during excavation into a meaningful narrative of the past.
Lithic analysis refers to the detailed study of stone tools and other chipped stone artifacts using scientific techniques. It allows archaeologists to understand human behaviors and adaptations in prehistoric times.

Lithic Analysis

Lithic analysis refers to the detailed study of stone tools and other chipped stone artifacts using scientific techniques. It allows archaeologists to understand human behaviors and adaptations in prehistoric times.
The law of superposition is a key axiom in geology and archaeology that states that in undisturbed layers of rocks or soils, the youngest layer is on top, and the oldest is on the bottom. In other words, each layer is presumed to be older than the one above but younger than the one below, allowing geologists and archaeologists to piece together the chronological order of events that formed these layers.

Law of Superposition

The law of superposition is a key axiom in geology and archaeology that states that in undisturbed layers of rocks or soils, the youngest layer is on top, and the oldest is on the bottom. In other words, each layer is presumed to be
Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is a sophisticated and valuable geophysical tool that deploys radar pulses to generate an image of the subsurface. It uses electromagnetic radiation in the microwave band of the radio spectrum and detects reflected signals from structures or inconsistencies beneath the ground.

Ground Penetrating Radar

Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is a sophisticated and valuable geophysical tool that deploys radar pulses to generate an image of the subsurface. It uses electromagnetic radiation in the microwave band of the radio spectrum and detects reflected signals from structures or inconsistencies beneath the ground.
As the practice of archaeology becomes increasingly digital, Computer Aided Mapping (CAM) is playing an integral role in the preservation, analysis, and communication of archaeological data. Combining technology with conventional archaeological practices, CAM offers revolutionary perspectives on interpreting the past.

Computer Aided Mapping

As the practice of archaeology becomes increasingly digital, Computer Aided Mapping (CAM) is playing an integral role in the preservation, analysis, and communication of archaeological data. Combining
Potassium-Argon dating method (K-Ar), a radiometric technique leveraging the decay of potassium-40 to argon-40. The K-Ar method has been instrumental in providing archeologists with reliable age estimates, particularly in dating volcanic rocks and ashes, which are often found near archeological sites.

Potassium-Agron Dating Method

Potassium-Argon dating method (K-Ar), a radiometric technique leveraging the decay of potassium-40 to argon-40. The K-Ar method has been instrumental in providing archeologists with reliable age estimates, particularly in dating volcanic rocks and ashes, which are often found near archeological sites.
Thermoluminescence dating (TL), a prevalent method in archaeological science, provides an effective technique for dating ancient artifacts and geological materials. It measures the accumulated radiation dose of the time elapsed since the material containing crystalline minerals was heated or exposed to sunlight.

Thermoluminescence Dating

Thermoluminescence dating (TL), a prevalent method in archaeological science, provides an effective technique for dating ancient artifacts and geological materials. It measures the accumulated radiation dose of the time elapsed since the material containing crystalline minerals was heated or exposed to sunlight.