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Society

Society refers to a group of individuals who share a common culture, institutions, and organization, and who interact with each other within a specific geographical or social space. This category covers topics related to the study of human society, including social structures, organizations, and institutions, as well as the relationships and interactions among individuals and groups. From exploring the evolution of human societies to examining the impact of social change, this category provides insights into the complex and dynamic nature of human social life.

Concept of Dominant Caste in Anthropology

Dominant Caste

Dominant caste is a unique concept in the Indian social structure, representing the ascendant caste group that exercises significant control and influence within a specific region.
Varna System in Anthropology

Varna System

The Varna System is a hierarchical classification within the Hindu society that has persisted for thousands of years. This framework classifies society into four main categories: Brahmins, Kshatriyas, Vaishyas, and Shudras.
Derived from the Tongan word "Tabu," meaning "forbidden" or "prohibited," Taboo refers to actions, behaviours, or  subjects that are considered forbidden, offensive, or socially unacceptable within a particular culture or society. It encompasses a wide range of practices, beliefs, and  Rituals that are considered to be improper or beyond the bounds of what is  acceptable.

Taboo

Derived from the Tongan word "Tabu," meaning "forbidden" or "prohibited," Taboo refers to actions, behaviours, or  subjects that are considered forbidden, offensive, or socially unacceptable within a particular culture or society.
An ethnic group represents a category of people who identify with each other, usually on the basis of presumed similarities such as common ancestry, language, history, society, culture or nation. Ethnicity is often an inherited status, but it can also be adopted, shed, and renegotiated over time.

Ethnic Group

An ethnic group represents a category of people who identify with each other, usually on the basis of presumed similarities such as common ancestry, language, history, society, culture or nation. Ethnicity is often an inherited status, but it can also be adopted, shed, and renegotiated over time.
A community is a group of individuals sharing common values, interests, or geographic location who interact with one another on a more frequent basis than with others outside the community. The concept of community holds significant sociological and anthropological implications and has evolved dramatically with the advent of technology and the internet.

Community

A community is a group of individuals sharing common values, interests, or geographic location who interact with one another on a more frequent basis than with others outside the community. The concept of community holds significant sociological and anthropological implications and has evolved dramatically with the advent of technology and the internet.
The structures of egalitarian and non-egalitarian societies highlight different aspects of human social organization. While egalitarian societies reflect values of equality and shared responsibility, non-egalitarian societies underscore the human inclination towards structure, hierarchy, and individual achievement.

Egalitarian and Non-Egalitarian Societies

The structures of egalitarian and non-egalitarian societies highlight different aspects of human social organization. While egalitarian societies reflect values of equality and shared responsibility, non-egalitarian societies underscore the human inclination towards structure, hierarchy, and individual achievement.
Social Sanctions play an integral role in maintaining societal norms and values by influencing individual behavior. They can be classified into positive and negative sanctions, each of which has formal and informal variations.

Social Sanction

Social Sanctions play an integral role in maintaining societal norms and values by influencing individual behavior. They can be classified into positive and negative sanctions, each of which has formal and informal variations.
The dichotomy of Universalisation and Parochialisation represents the cultural dynamic of an increasingly interconnected world. Understanding these processes provides valuable insights into how societies and cultures negotiate their identities in the face of globalisation.

Universalisation and Parochialisation

The dichotomy of Universalisation and Parochialisation represents the cultural dynamic of an increasingly interconnected world. Understanding these processes provides valuable insights into how societies and cultures negotiate their identities in the face of globalisation.
Urban society, the societal segment that resides in cities, has always been an intriguing subject for anthropologists. Its complexities, diversity, and constantly evolving nature provide a fertile ground for anthropological study.

Urban Society

Urban society, the societal segment that resides in cities, has always been an intriguing subject for anthropologists. Its complexities, diversity, and constantly evolving nature provide a fertile ground for anthropological study.
Peasant society represent a category of agrarian societies where the major mode of subsistence depends on small-scale agriculture. While the label ‘peasant’ may bear historical and cultural connotations, researchers aim to elucidate the anthropological understanding of peasant societies, drawing on key studies and theories.

Peasant Society

Peasant society represent a category of agrarian societies where the major mode of subsistence depends on small-scale agriculture. While the label ‘peasant’ may bear historical and cultural connotations, researchers aim to elucidate the anthropological understanding of peasant societies, drawing on key studies and theories.
Social stratification refers to the organization of individuals into social hierarchies based on various factors such as wealth, power, and prestige. These hierarchies are often stable across generations and influence the opportunities available to people within society.

Social Stratification

Social stratification refers to the organization of individuals into social hierarchies based on various factors such as wealth, power, and prestige. These hierarchies are often stable across generations and influence the opportunities available to people within society.